Knowledge Competencies

Knowledge refers to the practical or theoretical understanding of a subject.

Knowledge requirements can be described in terms of mastery levels. The descriptions below outline mastery levels for the following job types:

  1. Professional Positions
  2. Clerical and Administrative Positions
  3. Managerial Positions


Professional Positions
Professional knowledge can be split into three levels: paraprofessional/technical, journey, and senior. Entry-level professional positions typically require journey-level knowledge at hire, with a plan to grow the skill level.

  • Paraprofessional/Technician-level: Knowledge of a profession's basic principles, rules, equipment, and software. Knowledge is typically used in standardized processes.
  • Journey-level: Includes additional, in-depth knowledge of a profession's legal standards, generally accepted principles, theory, and best practices. Knowledge is typically used to determine the best approach to solving a complex issue or problem.
  • Senior-level: Includes additional knowledge of a profession's trends, research, and case law. Knowledge is typically used to create new strategies, standards, and processes.

 

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Clerical and Administrative Positions
Clerical and administrative knowledge can be split into three levels: entry, journey, and senior.

  • Entry-level: Knowledge of clerical equipment and software, processes, techniques, and professional standards. Knowledge is typically used in routine office work.
  • Journey-level: Includes additional, in-depth knowledge of best practices and generally accepted professional standards. Knowledge is typically used to determine the best approach to solving moderately complex issues or problems.
  • Senior-level: Includes additional, in-depth knowledge of office management and business process trends, practices, and research. Knowledge is typically used to create new strategies, standards, and processes.


Managerial Positions
Some positions are 'pure' managers, while others combine line-staff and managerial duties. Regardless, if the position includes managerial duties, additional knowledge requirements should be identified. Knowledge requirements for managerial duties can be broken down as follows:

  • Lead Workers: Knowledge of basic employee performance management standards and practices (e.g., performance planning, coaching, and feedback).
  • Supervisors: Includes additional, in-depth knowledge of advanced employee performance management standards and practices (e.g., performance evaluation, recognition and reward, and corrective action and discipline).
  • Program Managers: Includes additional knowledge of resource management standards and practices (e.g., budget, equipment, facilities, and vehicles), and the authorizing environment (e.g., internal business partners and program customers).
  • Executive Managers: Includes additional, in-depth knowledge of the authorizing environment (e.g., external stakeholders, oversight boards and committees, legislative environment, and regulatory agencies).